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Carpal & Cubital Tunnel Surgery (Carpal & Cubital Tunnel Release)

At the Advanced Center for Orthopedics, our surgeons specialize in the surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome, including Dr. Taylor and Dr. Blotter. The Advanced Center for Orthopedics has been performing orthopedic surgery, for more than three decades.

Two common causes for numbness, tingling, and pain in the hand are carpal tunnel syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome. Though they originate in different parts of the body, they are similar in that they are both caused by abnormal pressure being placed on a nerve, causing the aforementioned symptoms. In both cases, this pressure is caused by the narrowing of a “tunnel” through which the nerve passes. In the case of carpal tunnel syndrome, the bottom and sides of this tunnel are formed by the carpal bones of the wrist, and the top is formed by a band of tough connective tissue. In the case of cubital tunnel syndrome, the tunnel in question is formed by connective tissue that runs under a bony protrusion on the inside of the elbow called the medial epicondyle. This spot is colloquially referred to as the “funny bone.”

If nonsurgical treatments prove ineffective in treating either of these conditions, a simple surgical procedure called a “release” is often employed. In both cases, the surgeon will cut the “roof” of this tunnel, dividing it in two. Over time, new tissue bridges this gap, resulting in a larger tunnel with extra room for the nerve. As the nerve is no longer impinged, the symptoms typically go away. In most cases these release procedures are done on an outpatient basis, with the patient able to return home that day. However, as with any surgical intervention, the patient typically has to undergo a recuperation process that can involve follow-up care and physical therapy, depending on the particular situation.

To learn more about what to expect when you undergo carpal tunnel release or cubital tunnel release, please visit our surgery prep and recovery page.

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